Posts Tagged ‘White House’

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A delegation of 18 House Republicans is heading to the White House Thursday afternoon to propose a short-term increase in the debt ceiling, which the White House indicated President Obama could sign — but the deal would not resolve the partial government shutdown which is now in its 10th day.

The goal of the proposal appeared to be to buy time, by removing the immediate threat of missing an Oct. 17 deadline to raise the debt ceiling, for both sides to strike a broader agreement on spending and debt.

House Speaker John Boehner and his deputies announced the proposal after pitching it to rank-and-file Republicans in a closed meeting. The plan would allow for a six-week extension of the debt ceiling with no strings attached, as long as Obama and Democrats make a “real commitment” to negotiate over the partial government shutdown and a longer-term debt-ceiling hike.

“It’s time for leadership,” Boehner said.

White House Press Secretary Jay Carney indicated that Obama could sign it. While stressing that the president still needs to see a bill, he said that if a “clean” bill to hike the debt ceiling for six weeks hits his desk, “He would sign that.”

Carney said Obama still would strongly prefer that Congress approve a longer-term increase in the debt ceiling and approve a spending bill right away. Pressed repeatedly by reporters, Carney appeared to open the door to a short-term increase in the debt limit even if the partial government shutdown is not addressed.

That means the partial shutdown could easily continue into next week and beyond, without the pressure of the Oct. 17 deadline. That’s when Treasury officials warned the nation would be unable to pay all its bills, absent a debt-ceiling hike.

Inside the GOP caucus, reaction to the Republican leaders’ plan appeared to be mixed, with some voicing support and others voicing skepticism. One source said leadership was “taking the temperature of the conference” before taking the idea to Obama.

Despite Carney’s remarks, a prior statement from the White House was non-committal over the new plan.

A White House official said “we are willing to look at any proposal Congress puts forward to end these manufactured crises” but will not “allow a faction of the Republicans in the House to hold the economy hostage to its extraneous and extreme political demands.” The official said Obama still wants the House to pass a spending bill first, and raise the debt ceiling, before Obama will negotiate.

The official also reiterated that Obama would prefer a longer-term debt-ceiling increase, like the one-year extension the Senate is considering.

Sources said the new GOP proposal would increase the debt ceiling through a hard deadline of Nov. 22, but also call for negotiators to be appointed to discuss the budget — and require Obama to work with them on both the debt limit and budget.

Pressure is increasing on all sides to work out an agreement. Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew testified on Thursday that both stalemates are creating a drag on the economy and Wall Street.

He issued dire warnings about failing to raise the debt ceiling. He did not specifically warn that the government would be unable to pay interest on the debt, but said payments ranging from Social Security checks to Medicare reimbursements to military salaries could be halted by the end of the month.

He said some of the repercussions would be unpredictable since this is “uncharted territory.”

“It would be chaos,” Lew said.

Though some Republicans have accused the administration of exaggerating, many still do not want to toy with breaching the debt-ceiling deadline.

Senate Republicans are set to meet with Obama at the White House on Friday morning.

Fox News’ Mike Emanuel, Chad Pergram and Fox Business Network’s Rich Edson contributed to this report.

By Michael O’Brien and Frank Thorp, NBC News

President Barack Obama called Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, on Tuesday to again tell the top House Republican that he wouldn’t negotiate over reopening the government or raising the nation’s debt ceiling.

And, keeping up his pressure on Republicans in Congress, Obama will marshal the power of the bully pulpit during a 2 p.m. press conference at the White House.

The phone call came within an hour of Boehner’s most recent public plea for Obama and Senate Democrats to come to the bargaining table and agree to talks to solve the fiscal impasse.

“The president called the speaker again today to reiterate that he won’t negotiate on a government funding bill or debt limit increase,” Boehner aide Brendan Buck emailed reporters.

According to the White House, Obama “repeated what he told him when they met at the White House last week: the President is willing to negotiate with Republicans — after the threat of government shutdown and default have been removed.”
Obama also again demanded that Boehner bring up a clean extension of government spending and a clean approval of increased borrowing authority.
The call occurred at around 10:45 a.m., just a short while after Boehner emerged from a closed-door meetings to put the pressure on Obama to negotiate.
“There’s never been a president in our history been a president who didn’t negotiate over the debt limit. Never. Not once,” Boehner said following a closed-door meeting with fellow Republicans.
But the very subject of whether to negotiate has set Obama and Boehner apart — a difference on top of their opposing views over how to fund the government, and whether to preserve health care reform.
Obama and his Democratic allies have said they are more than happy to negotiate over any number of topics, but only after Republicans vote to approve a clean extension of government spending and authorize an increase in the debt limit.

President Barack Obama calls on Republican House Speaker John Boehner to bring a clean continuing resolution to the floor for a vote. Obama made the remarks Monday in Washington, D.C., while visiting FEMA headquarters.

“We’re not going to negotiate under the threat of further harm to our economy and middle-class families,” Obama said Monday at FEMA headquarters in Washington. “We’re not going to negotiate under the threat of a prolonged shutdown until Republicans get 100 percent of what they want.”

Democrats, meanwhile, have challenged Boehner to demonstrate his assertion over the weekend that a clean spending bill to reopen the government or a clean extension of the debt ceiling couldn’t pass the House.
“Speaker Boehner insists that the Senate-passed bill to end this shutdown can’t pass the House,” Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., said Tuesday. “Well, I’m not the first to issue this challenge … and that is, prove it. Bring it up for a vote.”

In short, political gamesmanship continued its stranglehold of Washington as the nation’s political leaders barreled toward the Oct. 17 deadline by which they must raise the nation’s debt limit or risk a severe shot to the U.S. economy and global financial markets.

There had been some speculation Tuesday that Republicans might consider a short-term extension of both spending and the debt limit in order to enter into serious fiscal talks with Obama. It would hand Democrats a minor victory immediately, but offer up a chance for the GOP to lock in reduced spending levels under the automatic “sequester” spending cuts. Republicans could also look to win entitlement or tax reforms as a result of such negotiations.

As Republicans mull their path forward, GOP leaders laid out a new plan to their rank-and-file on Tuesday that envisions the House passing two bills this week, one to guarantee pay for essential workers who have stayed on the job throughout the shutdown.

The other bill would establish a bipartisan negotiating team to tackle the debt limit and other fiscal issues, somewhat resembling some of the other official panels and working groups that have unsuccessfully tried to resolve the deep fiscal differences between Democrats and Republicans in recent years.

It’s not clear that this group would have any greater success, though, especially since its authority is nonbinding — unlike some of the past panels, like the 2011-2012 “supercommittee.”

Boehner dismissed talk of such a temporary resolution as “a lot of speculation,” refusing to engage with a reporter’s question. And the Republican speaker said that he didn’t have any particular standard by which he’s measuring the GOP’s willingness to enter into an eventual deal. “I’m not drawing any lines in the sand,” he said, later adding: “There’s no reason to make it more difficult to bring people to the table. There’s no boundaries here. There’s nothing on the table, there’s nothing off the table. I’m trying to do everything I can to bring people together and have a conversation.” As the shutdown continued to play out, there were increasing signs that the GOP was shouldering more of the political blame for the shutdown. An ABC News/Washington Post poll released Monday found, for instance, that seven in 10 Americans disapprove of the way congressional Republicans have handled negotiations over the federal budget. This story was originally published on Tue Oct 8, 2013 10:42 AM EDT

 

The suspect in the high-speed chase between the White House and the Capitol Building was identified Friday by a law enforcement source as a dental hygienist from Connecticut with a history of mental issues.

The source identified the woman as Miriam Carey, 34, of Stamford, Conn. Carey tried to plow her car into a barricade at the White House, then led cops on a high-speed chase before being shot dead near the Capitol, according to reports.

Rep. Michael McCaul, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, told Fox News that investigators believed  Carey suffered “serious” mental issues and that President Obama was trying to communicate with her through radio waves.

Sources tell Fox News that the FBI is currently investigating how long the suspect was in Washington, DC and why she had travelled there from Connecticut.

Leslie Silva, a Stamford lawyer who has represented Carey, said she was unaware of any connection or reason why Carey would have been in Washington.

“Oh my goodness, I represented her,” Silva said to when reached by phone.  “She was a really nice woman, we had [our] children at about the same time, we had pleasant conversation.”

Silva added that she represented Carey when she bought her Stamford condo and again more recently in a dispute over a small amount of money with the development that was settled in February, the last time she communicated with the suspect.

“I had nothing but pleasant conversations with her when I represented her and I’m just really really shocked,” she said.

A harrowing car chase unfolded Thursday after the driver rammed the barricades, briefly shuttering the chambers where federal lawmakers were debating how to end a government shutdown and stirred fresh panic in a city where a gunman two weeks ago killed 12 people.

Police said there appeared to be no direct link to terrorism, and there was no indication the woman was even armed. Capitol Police Chief Kim Dine, whose officers have been working without pay as a result of the shutdown, called it an “isolated, singular matter.”

Still, tourists, congressional staff and even some senators watched anxiously as a caravan of law enforcement vehicles chased a black Infiniti with Connecticut license plates down Constitution Avenue outside the Capitol and as officers with high-powered firearms canvassed the area.

The House and Senate both abruptly suspended business, a lawmaker’s speech cut off in mid-sentence, as the Capitol Police broadcast a message over its emergency radio system telling people to stay in place and move away from the windows.

The woman’s car at one point had been surrounded by police carsand she managed to escape, careening around a traffic circle and past the north side of the Capitol. Video shot by a TV cameraman showed police pointing firearms at her car before she rammed a Secret Service vehicle and continued driving. Metropolitan Police Chief Cathy Lanier said police shot and killed her a block northeast of the historic building.

Carey’s mother, Idella Carey, told ABC News Thursday night that her daughter began suffering from post-partum depression after giving birth to her daughter, Erica, last August.

Idella Carey said her daughter had “no history of violence” and she didn’t know why she was in Washington, D.C., on Thursday. She said she thought Carey was taking Erica to a doctor’s appointment in Connecticut. Authorities also discovered an unidentified white powder at her Connecticut home.

Fox News’ Perry Chiaramonte, Jana Winter and The Associated Press contributed to this report.