Posts Tagged ‘LinkedIn’

We love to surround ourselves with people who have similar thoughts and it creates this bubble perspective on the world. This is not unique in a social world because we also tend to do similar in our own work environment. There are many talking heads for social media advising brands in all sorts of ways. In many ways I am one too. This is not a negative for any of them and often they have some very good ideas. At the same time, should you follow the crowd or the advice? Are those of us thinking about these things living in our own little bubble? Are we drinking the Kool Aid? Maybe it is time we switch drinks.

Let me begin by saying I love social media and how it connects us to the world around us. Today, thanks to LinkedIn, I have built an extensive professional network. On and off of LinkedIn I have connected with so many amazing people allowing me to learn from so many of them. I have found old friends and built strong relationships with new friends. I have also found myself talking about social media for close to 6 years. Back in the early days we did not talk about that next viral hit, or how to push message. We did get excited about followers, until we realized how people manipulated the artificial number to make themselves feel better. The discussion was not about building the content warehouse or how a business would sell everything via social media. The conversation was much more basic than that. It was how social media would connect people, build relationships and break down the traditional silos that exist in society. We talked about how businesses would need to shift their approach to become a trusted partner with their Customers and not dictate a message. Businesses would have to learn to be more transparent and even trust their employee to become ambassadors of the brand. Behind every brand in the space, we knew the people involved. More important, we trusted them because they were one of us.

So what has happened since that time? I watched the conversation shift to a new group of talking heads, ones promising amazing results in social media. They could develop the next viral hit, or build millions of fans (it never matter if the fans were Customers, prospective Customers or human beings for that matter). Tools galore promised amazing reach for your content, and promises of top bloggers talking about your brand. Not a day goes by where I do not receive about 100 emails promising the greatest success in social media if I buy a tool or hire their agency. It cracks me up that these same tools promising social media success resort to spamming me via emails or cold calls. Studies galore demonstrate the amazing success these tools and firms have brought to their clients. Of course when your business tries to replicate the same success you do not see it, but the reality is the study was flawed from the start because it was designed to tell the story the business wanted to tell.

Listening became the buzz term, but really how good are businesses at listening? For years they have had Customers contacting them, but in their mind that was an annoying cost, not an opportunity to build a relationship or learn from the Customer. Customers have had survey data for years, yet did they really change based on the surveys? So now companies are told they must listen in social media. I would have suggested starting listening through all the other channels first, but that is me. So now they listen in social, but really what are they listening for? You will hear responses like innovation, process improvement, etc. The reality is most brands are listening to mentions of their brand to simply head off the next crisis. If we were truly interested in innovation or process improvement we would not focus on messages that state our brand. Instead we would be focusing on broader discussion involving what was important to our Customer. I expect many brands as they evaluate their listening tools, they will debate the value they have earned. The problem is it was most likely not the tool, but the way the business used the tool that will be a problem. Technology is not always the answer or the fix to your problem; it is much deeper than that.

At the end of the day social media is simply highlighting your brand for what it is. If you do not like the way your brand is portrayed, than you would need to work to change throughout the organization, not just apply new messaging to say how you are different. The world has changed before us and it will continue to evolve and it is important for your business to change with it. In my view this starts with understanding the relationship business you are in. Many businesses loved to use the term relationship, but the reality was the relationship in their mind was one sided. This is how the messaging always worked, but today this is no longer the case. Instead of getting frustrated by it, embrace the new paradigm before us. We have a chance to see the changes in business that we originally discussed back in 2007 and 2008. We had the fun, but now it is time to get down to the reality of social media. We have to embrace the power of our employees and our Customers. This is where you will find the true ROI in social media.

Source:  http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20131009164925-19577932-social-media-kool-aid?trk=cha-feed-art-title-211

Have you ever written a blog that was never read? Then you know how frustrating that is. If you’re just starting, you want to avoid this situation. Here are some ways to make a good, interesting blog.

    • Steps

      1. 1

        Choose an interesting topic. Boring topics generally are not good for blogs, unless you are one of few people who are genius writers; those who can create beautiful prose even when writing about the most mundane things.

    • Pick a topic that you know and are passionate about, one that other people can relate to. If you like video games, for example, write one detailing your experiences playing them. Note that this kind of blog is different from a ‘Dear Diary’ blog discussed below.
    • Avoid writing your own biography. A “Dear Diary” blog isn’t interesting to other people unless you are a really significant person. Think about it: who would really want to know what you ate for dinner? This kind of blog is self-indulgent and gratuitous; it does not offer anything to the people reading it.
  1. 2

    Funny blog posts tend to become viral. Humorous charts, pictures, and videos are great supplements to your text.

  2. 3

    Do not rehash or rewrite blog posts from famous blogs. Try to think of unique things to write about, or write an opposing view on a certain subject.

  3. 4

    Instead of just repeating news reports (as most bloggers tend to do), write your own commentary. What do you think of an issue? Offer your views and analysis. Ask you readers what their opinions are too. This brings us to:

  4. 5

    Make your blog interactive. Provide your readers some way to express themselves by letting them comment on your articles and voting on polls.

  5. 6

    Write clearly. Be conscious of grammar and spelling. Write the standard way; it is irritating to read words and sentences like ‘tHiS iS a CoOl SeNtEnCe,’ or ‘Wh@t are you D0ing?’ for example.

EditTips

  • Make sure you have good visuals. No one likes to read a black and white blog. There can be pictures or videos and they do not necessarily have to be of you.
  • Be honest and true to your views. This makes you a sincere and reputable writer. In being one you’ll eventually have a loyal readership, one that will keep coming back to your blog and recommend it to others because they know they’ll get high-quality and helpful reads every time.
  • Inform you readers from the beginning if an article is sponsored. People hate being led-on and tricked into reading a blog post that they expect to be helpful, just to realize that it is a subjective and promotional one.

EditWarnings

  • Never plagiarize other blog posts, news articles, reviews, and books. Copying and pasting articles and passing them off as your own is illegal and immoral. Provide proper attribution if you must quote another’s work.

Article Info

Categories: Blog Basics

Recent edits by: Vasiliaskid, Justine Halligan, Teresa

Source: http://www.wikihow.com/Write-a-Good-Interesting-Blog