Archive for the ‘nutrition’ Category

Published November 27, 2013

FoxNews.com
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The manager of an Indiana Pizza Hut claims he was fired for refusing to open the restaurant on Thanksgiving.

Tony Rohr, who worked his way up from cook to manager at the restaurant, in Elkhart, Ind., over 10 years, said the company that owns the store dictated it be open for the holiday, and he refused.

“I said, ‘Why can’t we be the company that stands up and says we care about our employees and they can have the day off,?'” Rohr told WSBT 22. “Thanksgiving and Christmas are the only two days that they’re closed in the whole year and they’re the only two days that those people are guaranteed to have off to spend with their families.”

Pizza Hut rep told the station that the decision to remain open on Thanksgiving wasn’t up to Rohr, and that it came from the corporate level.

Rohr wrote a letter venting his frustrations, saying: “I do not resign. However, I accept that the refusal to comply with this greedy, immoral request means the end of my tenure with this company.” He added, “I hope you realize that it is the people at the bottom of the totem pole that make your life possible.”

Later, the station got in touch with the director of operations for the local chain and he told the news station that Rohr did not get fired, but rather, he quit.

Pizza Hut is owned by Yum! Brands, which also owns Taco Bell and KFC.

I coined a phrase to define this world we live in where everyone has an opinion and there are a multitude of ways to express that opinion. I call it, “The Feedback Society.”

Whether on a consumer review site like Yelp; in the ‘comments’ section of an online publication; or something as simple as calling your congressperson, it’s clear that everyone has an opinion and they are eager to share it with as many people as possible.

The vast majority of these are anonymous postings—or as I like to tell my celebrity clients, “Writing on a bathroom wall.” I actively discourage them from reading it knowing that they can be toxic, mean-spirited and just plain hurtful. As their representative I do take into account the whole of the feedback, so I have an idea of how a story is being received.

Certainly a public relations person is tasked with presenting a client to the public, but equally important is letting the client know what kind of environment they are stepping into and how their news is being received.

President Obama has access to some of the most sophisticated opinion analysts in the world. And while he can certainly take heart in the fact that his own approval rating held steady at about 44 percent during the government shutdown while Republicans were plummeting; it is equally clear that the rollout of the Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare) has been a real shit show.

His problems didn’t begin with the rollout; they began with a lame effort at selling Obamacare to the American people. His lack of clear targeted messaging and inability to get people behind it at the grass roots level made it easy prey for his political opponents.

Even people who clearly stood to benefit from provisions in the act expressed their hatred for it. His own ham-handed PR rollout was further denigrated by the opposition who took, and still take, every opportunity to demonize the law and its provisions.

Despite losing the PR battle, POTUS won the war. The Affordable Care Act is the law of the land, passed by both houses of Congress and signed by the President. It has the added bonus of being vetted by the U.S. Supreme Court and found lawful.

The official rollout of the Affordable Care Act coincided with the shutdown of the U.S. government by Congress on October 1. Defunding Obamacare was the major incentive for shutting down the government and, ironically, opposition to the shutdown made the act more popular than it had been.

What was clear from the beginning of the rollout was that the online systems to handle a massive rollout of complicated and sophisticated data was just not in place and the system crashed.

Despite multiple news reports that 476,000 Americans have applied for the coverage, no one seems to have access to accurate information. Additionally, this bill was, in part, designed to simplify the health care coverage process.

The inability of the government to handle this system supported the opponents’ argument that it’s just too big and complicated for the government to handle and would be better dealt with by private industry.

On Monday, President Obama held a news conference, which some referred to as an ‘infomercial,’ to discuss the state of the law.

To his credit, he didn’t sugarcoat the problems and expressed his own believable and apparent frustration with the technical aspects of the rollout.

Not surprisingly, his political opponents are using the glitches to heir own advantage. Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell tweeted that a visit to the Obamacare website made a trip to the Department of Motor Vehicles seem pleasant.

While millions stand to benefit from the provisions of Obamacare, the system is dependent on people, indeed millions of people, signing up for the system. When the system designed to manage that doesn’t work, the result is chaos, frustration and a huge political opportunity for opponents.

And if The Affordable Care Act cannot attract the critical mass it needs to make the numbers work, it could be a very costly program.

I’m glad the President owned the problem. But what’s more important is that he owns the solution. Because, unless he gets an effective and efficient system in place to access the new provisions, The Affordable Care Act and the benefits possible to tens of millions of uninsured Americans will go down as his greatest folly and a huge failure for any future government program that dares to think big.

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

What’s in a chicken nugget? If you think it’s all white meat and some breading, an American scientist is suggesting you’re wrong.

 

TORONTO – What’s in a chicken nugget? If you think it’s all white meat and some breading, an American scientist is suggesting you’re wrong.

After conducting his own “autopsy” into chicken nuggets from two unnamed fast food restaurants, Dr. Richard deShazo says that the finger food is actually made with only 40 to 50 per cent meat. The rest? It’s all fat, skin, connective tissue, blood vessels, nerves and bone fragments.

“I was floored. I had read what other reports have said is in them and I didn’t believe it. I was astonished actually seeing it under a microscope,” deShazo, a medicine and pediatrics professor at theUniversity of Mississippi, said.

“What has happened is that some companies have chosen to use an artificial mixture of chicken parts rather than low-fat chicken white meat, batter it up and fry it, and still call it chicken,” he said in a statement.

White chicken meat is a great source of lean protein. Chicken by-product, which deShazo claims is used in nuggets, is high in calories, salt, sugar and fat.

“Even worse, it tastes great and kids love it and it is marketed to them,” he said.

Read more: Measuring meals by exercise, not calories helps consumers eat healthy: study

His complete findings were published in the American Journal of MedicineRead the study here.

DeShazo collaborated with a pathologist, Dr. Steven Bigler, for his study. They stained, sliced and analyzed the nuggets. They wouldn’t say where the nuggets came from, though.

What’s in a chicken nugget? If you think it’s all white meat and some breading, an American scientist is suggesting you’re wrong.

(Supplied photo)

In a statement to Global News, McDonald’s said that the study is not referring to its McNuggets.

“The fact is McDonald’s Chicken McNuggets are made using white breast meat chicken. We do not use dark meat, organ meats, cartilage or bone in our Chicken McNuggets,” a spokesperson said in a statement.

She said the only chicken in the nugget is white breast meat, with a bit of chicken skin for flavour. The breading is a crunchy tempura batter. She couldn’t tell Global the “exact recipe for competitive reasons.”

Read more: How much sugar is in Nutella? Canadian doctor decodes what’s in the hazelnut spread

Its website says McNuggets are made with “USDA-inspected white meat.” Meanwhile, Burger King says its nuggets are made with “premium white meat” and Wendy’s also says “our nuggets are made with all white-meat.”

The National Chicken Council in the U.S. told Reuters that nuggets are an “excellent source” of protein, especially for picky eaters.

“This study evaluates only two chicken nugget samples out of the billions of chicken nuggets that are made every year,” Ashley Peterson, vice president of the organization told the wire service.

Read more: 5 tips for packing healthy, kid-friendly back to school lunches

DeShazo said fast-food chains aren’t necessarily misleading their consumers, it’s just that diners need to consider what’s on their plate when they’re eating out.

“We just don’t take the time to understand basic nutritional facts – this is a health literacy issue – and to push back when our kids and grandkids, who do not know the risks of being obese, beg for unhealthy foods,” he said.

carmen.chai@globalnews.ca